2018: The Chaplain Kit in Review

2018-Website-Page-View-Map2018 has been an amazing year for The Chaplain Kit. The website had nearly 80,000 page views compared to about 43,000 in 2017. Of those 80,000 views, over 56,000 came from the U.S. while nearly 3,000 came from the UK, over 1,300 from Canada, over 1,000 from France, nearly 1,000 from Germany with several hundred each (in order of views) from Australia, Philipines, South Korea, Belgium, Japan, Hong Kong, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Poland, Romania, Ireland, Indonesia, Russian, Brazil, Ukraine, Kuwait and the European Union. Fewer than one hundred each came from 130 other countries.

AP I VNM IRAQ THROUGH VIETNAM

Of the pages viewers went to, Prayers had the most views with nearly 10,000 followed by Chaplain Kits (1,474), Chaplain Corps Prints (1,111) and Chaplain Uniforms (1,016). Stories that were viewed were led by “Chaplain” John McCain (1,168), Truce in the Forest: The Story of a World War II Christmas Eve Truce Between German & American Soldiers During the Battle of the Bulge (1,602), One Chaplain’s Near-Encounter with General (Ret.) James Mattis (669) and I Walked to the Gallows with the Nazi Chiefs (648).

Referers to The Chaplain Kit website were topped by Facebook, primarily through The Chaplain Kit’s Facebook page (which is about to reach 700 page likes) followed by the WordPress Android app, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, WordPress Viewer, Operation Where We Are, Linkedin, Chaplains International, Norwich University and a number of search engines.

In the past five years, The Chaplain Kit has come to include a greater variety of chaplain history and ministry resources, growing from 2014 when The Chaplain Kit had only 2,234 views with most of those being of simple pages showing chaplain kits.

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About Daryl Densford

I am an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene serving as an active-duty Army Chaplain. I am currently the Deputy Garrison Chaplain at Fort Wainwright, Fairbanks, Alaska.

Posted on 1 January 2019, in Chaplaincy, History, The Chaplain Kit and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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