Chaplain Stories

Chaplain Julius J. BabstChaplain for Life: A Short History of Chaplain Julius J. Babst. Chaplain Babst entered the Army as a chaplain in 1917 and left almost right away for France with the 23rd Infantry Regiment.  I became aquainted with him when I came into possesion of a box from a “Sick-Call Outfit” which had written on the back, “23rd Infantry, France, February 3, 1918.  After serving in World War One where he earned the Distinguished Service Cross twice, he rose to the rank of Colonel before dying while still on active duty in 1943.  Continue reading . . .

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chaplain-merle_d_brown-2Chaplain Merle Brown: Last Chaplain Casualty of the Vietnam WarChaplain (Capt.) Merle D. Brown was the last Army Chaplain casualty of the Vietnam War. On Easter Sunday, April 11, 1971, he was killed in a helicopter crash in the Quang Ngai province. Brown is honored on Panel 4W, Row 118 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Continue reading …

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chaplain-john-p-chidwickHero of the Maine: Chaplain John P. Chidwick. Night, February 15, 1898, the American battleship USS Maine lay at anchor in the harbor of Havana.  Although tensions were running high between the US government and Spain, the colonial power occupying Cuba, the night was calm.  Suddenly, at 9:40 PM,  a huge explosion devastated the forward section of the Maine, an external explosion setting off the powder in the magazines of the Maine.  Into this vision of hell on Earth strode the Catholic Chaplain of the Maine, John P. Chidwick. Continue reading …

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Chaplain Herman G FelhoelterFaithful Service: The First Army Chaplain Casualty of the Korean War. Chap. Herman G. Felhoelter served with the 19th Infantry Regiment. On July 16, 1950, Felhoelter was north of Taejon helping a group carry 30 wounded Soldiers. They came under attack and when it became apparent they could not endure the enemy assault. Felhoelter convinced the medical officer to lead all able Soldiers to safety while he remained with the wounded and dying. They were soon attacked and killed. Felhoelter, who posthumously received the Distinguished Service Cross, was the first Chaplain Corps casualty in Korea.  Continue reading …

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Chaplain George Warnie FosheeChaplain George Warnie Foshee: A Good and Faithful Servant.  U.S. Army Chaplain George Warnie Foshee was transferred from US Army Fort Benning, GA to Vietnam in February of 1963. He was assigned to the MAAG (Military Assistance Advisory Group) in Hue, South Vietnam, and remained there for his 14 month duty assignment. Continue reading . . .

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Chaplain Albert HoffmanChaplain Albert Hoffman:  The Most Decorated Chaplain of World War TwoU.S. Army Chaplain (Captain) Albert J. Hoffman was a Catholic chaplain known as the “most decorated chaplain” of World War II. His battle stories appeared in Time, Newsweek and Life as well as a comic book. He received the Silver Star, Purple Heart and Distinguished Service Cross. Continue reading…

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Chaplain Angelo J. LitekyChaplain Angelo J. Liteky. The son of a career Navy noncommissioned officer, Angelo J. Liteky recalled that “I was always very comfortable around service people, and it was easy for me to go into the service.” In 1966, six years after being ordained a Roman Catholic priest, Liteky did just that—he became an Army chaplain, was assigned to the 199th Light Infantry Brigade, and was soon on his way to Vietnam.  Continue reading . . .

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Chaplain Karl W. ScheuflerA Remarkable Life: Karl W. Scheufler-Minister, Missionary and Chaplain.  Occasionally, I come across people who really impress me. Sometimes these are living people, many times they have died long ago. I usually become acquainted with these “dead” people through something of theirs that I have found or purchased. This is the case with Karl William Scheufler.  I bought a few postal covers (decorated envelopes) that he had sent to his wife and son during World War Two from Europe.  Continue reading . .  .

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Calvin P. TitusChaplain Assistant and MOH Winner CPL Calving P. Titus. As the only chaplain assistant to be awarded the Medal of Honor, Calvin Pearl Titus is often cited as a model of bravery and selflessness. Yet, his award for daring gallantry–during combat in China when he was a corporal–actually came at the start of a long Army career of assisting chaplains in ministry, whether as an official chaplain assistant or not. Continue reading….

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four chaplainsThe Four Chaplains.  It was Feb. 3, 1943, and the U.S. Army Transport Dorchester was one of three ships in a convoy, moving across the Atlantic from Newfoundland to an American base in Greenland. A converted luxury liner, the Dorchester was crowded to capacity, carrying 902 servicemen, merchant seamen and civilian workers.  Continue reading . . .

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