Army Chaplain Corps Museum

The United States Army Chaplain Museum is located at the US Army Chaplain Center and School at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. It’s not a large museum, but it is very well done and the exhibits and signage document much of the history and development of the Army Chaplain Corps. There aren’t many artifacts until you get to the World War I era, but the museum is home to many significant collections including Chaplain Francis Duffy’s vestments and ecclesiastical items from World War I; the communion set that Chaplain Gerecke used at Nuremberg as well as Goering’s gloves that he gave to Chaplain Gerecke; and Chaplain Emil Kapaun’s vestments. There is also a nice sampling of chaplain kits from many eras, as well as POW-made chapel furniture and Soldier-made altarware, both from World War II. Additionally, the archives at the museum houses a substantial collection of records, personal papers and other artifacts available for research by appointment.

If you are ever in the area, a stop at the U.S. Army Chaplain Museum is well worth your time. Until then, here are some pictures that I took on my last visit. I didn’t take pictures of everything, including many pictures on display, but I tried to capture significant displays and artifacts. Understand that they are not professional pictures, and in many of them you can see my reflection but they’ll give you an idea of what you have to look forward to on your visit to the museum.

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ACM-Stained-Glass-1

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The Beginning

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The American Revolution to the Civil War

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ACM-Watts

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ACM-CW--

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Chaplains Abroad & Towards the West

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World War I

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World War II

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Korean War

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Vestments worn by Father Kapaun

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Vietnam War

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9/11 – OEF – OIF

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Tools of the Trade

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The Chaplain School

ACM-Chaplain-School-Display

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Chaplain Uniform & Insignia

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The Chaplain Assistant

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Another site with more pictures of the museum can be found at Arthur Taussig’s website, The Museum Project.

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