Category Archives: Chaplaincy

Remembering the Five Chaplains of the Mallory

Just four days after The Four Chaplains were lost with the sinking of the Dorchester, five more chaplains died when a German sub sunk the Mallory, on this day in Chaplain Corps History, 7 February 1943.

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If you’d like more information on the Mallory’s last voyage, the five chaplains who perished as well as the two chaplains who survived, and other details not included in the shorter version above, this 15-minute video is for you!

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Remember the Four Chaplains

3 February 1943: On This Day in Chaplain Corps History, Chaplains Goode, Fox, Poling and Washington were on the U.S.A.T. Dorchester in the North Atlantic when a German submarine torpedoed and sent it to the bottom of a watery grave. These four chaplains exemplified nurturing the living, caring for the wounded and honoring the dead as they sacrificed their own safety and lives to minister to the needs of others as they served God and country.

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Chaplains in Chapels Drinking Coffee

Excited to share the next episode of Chaplains in Chapels Drinking Coffee! In this episode, we went to Fort Benning, Georgia and visited with Chaplain Estella Karr at the Interfaith Chapel she helped to establish.

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Remembering the Attack on Pearl Harbor

There were many Chaplains and Chaplain Assistants who not only did their jobs but went far above and beyond to serve during and immediately following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and surrounding bases. In this 10-minute video, I explore the stories of some of them.

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Centennial of the Dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

One hundred years ago on 11 November 1921, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was dedicated when the remains of an unknown Soldier from World War One was interred while four chaplains participated in the ceremony.

Three years after the end of World War 1, an unidentified Soldier who had been killed in fighting in France during the war was brought to Washington D.C. and lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda until 11 November 1921. On this Armistice day, the body of the unknown Soldier was committed and interred outside the Memorial Amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery, along with the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Chaplain (COL) John T. Axton commitments the body of an unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, 21 November 1921 (author’s collection).

Continuing reading this story and see more pictures here.

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On This Day in Chaplain Corps History

On 24 June 1917, after devoting thirty years to the development of a professional Army chaplaincy, Orville J. Nave died of injuries he received when he was hit by a trolley. His amazing career began in the Civil War and continued until this day in Chaplain Corps history, 24 June 1917.

His story is too long to tell in a short video but here are some of the highlights of his influential career:

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On This Day in Chaplain Corps History

On 17 June 1775, militias from Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Hampshire met on Bunker’s and Breed’s Hills overlooking Boston Harbor to challenge the British’s occupation of Boston and the harbor. It was a bloody day of battle with the field going to the Crown, but it bolstered the cause of liberty in the colonies. Not only were patriots from these three colonies, and several others there, putting their lives on the line for their freedom, but there were also at least four chaplains there, enduring the danger and hardships of their new fighting parish, On This Day in Chaplain Corps History. Here are their stories:

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On This Day in Chaplain Corps History

On 6 June 1944, the largest amphibious combat assault in history took place as Allied forces landed in Normandy by air and sea. Among them were 13 chaplains who parachuted in with the airborne troops and many more who landed on the beaches. In this episode of “On This Day in Chaplain Corps History,” the stories of some of those chaplains are told.

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A Virtual tour of Chaplains Hill

There’s a quiet place set aside at Arlington National Cemetery where chaplains are remembered and honored. It’s called Chaplains Hill. What better time than Memorial Day to visit Chaplains Hill and be reminded of the service and sacrifice of the chaplains buried there?

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On this day in Chaplain Corps history

On 28 May 1948 the United States Post Office issued a stamp honoring the four chaplains who perished ministering to others when the Dorchester sunk after being torpedoed by a German Submarine in World War Two. Here’s a little more history about the stamp with a lot of samples of the First Day Covers.

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